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To Benefit All Humanity: WFWP New Jersey Hopes for Unity of North and South Korea

Written by  December 1st, 2017
To Benefit All Humanity: WFWP New Jersey Hopes for Unity of North and South Korea

On November 11, 2017, the New Jersey Chapter of WFWP held an assembly under the banner of the “Global Rally for Peaceful Unification.” Inspired by Chapter Chairwoman Denneze Nelson and hosted by Monika Lewis, the Women’s Federation volunteers organized a group of speakers who shared their impressive knowledge and experiences to explain the desire and need for unification between the South and the North. Ideas from Korean culture, such as the emphasis on family and society, permeated the two-hour presentation. The following is a brief description of the talks given that cannot do justice to the full details and documentation that the speakers shared that morning. The speakers were members of the WFWP New Jersey chapter.

Mr. Philip Soai-Van gave a succinct description of the Korean War in the 1950’s titled, “Why Did Americans Fight the Korean War?” America’s involvement in the Korean War prevented Communist domination throughout the Eurasian Continent as well as Western Europe. Communist expansion would not be tolerated by the free world. This policy of containment would provoke the collapse of the Soviet Regime and an end to the Cold War. While the war failed to result in making the Korean nation whole, the world benefits from the economic growth of liberated South Korea.

On the topic of “Why Korean Unity is Important to Koreans,” Mrs. Sunghee Soai-Van explained the dire need to liberate those in the North from the hands of dictatorship and poverty. Korean families on both sides of the 38th Parallel yearn to reunite with each other and to live in a state of peace and economic well being.

In “The Importance of Korean Unification,” Mr. Kyong Bok Bang stressed that despite the obstacles, Korean unification is an irresistible goal. The major precept at its founding was that the Korean nation exists “to benefit all humanity.” The 4,349th anniversary of National Foundation Day was celebrated in Seoul, Korea on October 13, 2017, and this same point was reiterated by the Prime Minister. Change is coming, as people in the North surreptitiously learn more about life outside the North Korean borders. We should support the unity of South and North because it is the will of God and symbolizes a world of peace.

The final presentation, “Become the Bright Light of Peace,” was given by Mr. Gerry Servito. Since the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917, materialistic atheism has been spreading throughout the world’s societies. While anti-religious attitudes have increased, the leadership of Reverend Moon and his wife, Dr. Hak Ja Han Moon, and the activities of the many organizations initiated over the decades, have provided substantial influence and results in the ideological battle to end the Cold War between Democracy and Communism. “Conflict transformation” was achieved through the use of principled diplomacy.

After a brief question/answer period, all participants held hands and concluded the assembly by singing “The Impossible Dream.” Peter Lewis and his family provided the music, and Ryan Abenir prepared the audio/visual systems for the event. Many thanks to the presenters, volunteers, and attendees, who all gave of their time and personal resources to make this a touching and informative meeting. Thanks to Reverend and Mrs. Manoj Jacob for the use of the Clifton Family Church Fellowship Hall.

Especially moving was the Lewis family’s rendition of the German song “Vom Selben Stern”, with some translated lyrics as follows:

Get up, get dressed,
Now it’s time for new spirits.
I will take the pain away from you,
I will take the pain away from you.
Open the window, turn up the volume.
The remaining ice has melted.
I will take the pain away from you,
I will take the pain away from you.
We are all made of stardust.
There is a warm glance in our eyes.
We are still not broken.
We are still intact.